Heat Stress FAQs

Are personal monitors for heat stress available?

A: The QTII Personal Heat Stress Monitor is available and recommended for workers less able to tolerate the impact of heat stress.

Are personal monitors for heat stress available?

A: The QTII Personal Heat Stress Monitor is available and recommended for workers less able to tolerate the impact of heat stress.

Can I use a WBGT heat stress monitor indoors and outdoors?

A: Yes, the instruments automatically calculates and displays two separate WBGT values for indoor and outdoor applications.

Is there an indication of a high or unacceptable level of WBGT?

A: An indication of ‘stay time’ is provided in accordance with several international standards.

The WBGT instruments have a wet bulb thermometer. How is that maintained as a wet sensor?

A: The sensor has a reservoir that requires distilled water for accurate readings.

The wet reservoir may dry out and I will be unable to top it up. Is there an alternative?

A: The QT44 and 46 models incorporate a 'waterless wetbulb' sensor for calculation of wet bulb temperature. This sensor is ideal when an instrument is required to operate for a long time or is unattended.

What does an area heat stress monitor measure?

A: An area  heat stress monitor measures WBGT (wet bulb globe temperature) in accordance with BS EN 27243. This requires measurement of natural wet bulb, globe and air temperatures.

What happens if the wet bulb reservoir is not filled or dries out?

A: If the wet bulb reservoir dries out inaccurate readings will be provided. Always maintain a reasonable level of water in the reservoir.

What makes people vulnerable to heat stress?

A: Physiological response to heat stress varies from person to person. Those who may be physically unfit, not acclimatised to the environment or taking medication or drugs may be less tolerant.
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